Tech

Protect Your Calm + Focus – Edit Your Phone Notifications

May 24, 2019

I’m Kelly Nolan.
I'm an attorney who'd been decently organized through law school but got quickly overwhelmed as a actual attorney. After nothing else worked for me, I created this system – and kept on practicing law. Years later, I found out others were interested in learning it, so that's what I do now! Let's get this realistic system in your hands so you can start living a life that feels more calm, doable, and that lights you up.
Categories
More breathing space in 20 minutes
Yes, please
free guide

The whole point of a phone notification is to interrupt you no matter what you’re doing to make you pay attention to something else.

Really let that sink in.

A notification’s ENTIRE purpose is to interrupt whatever you’ve CHOSEN to focus on to get you to react to something else you did NOT choose to focus on.

The takeaway: be stingy with what you give that much power to.

I recommend only allowing notifications for these everyday apps:

  • Texts,

  • Phone calls, and

  • Calendar events/tasks.

Also, keep the alerts that you rely on, that serve you well, and don’t go off incessantly. For example, I allow notifications for the below apps because they notify me very infrequently and usually only when it’s super relevant:

  • Uber/Lyft,

  • My weather app Dark Sky (it comes in with a handy “bring your umbrella with you” alert),

  • Airline apps (they don’t alert unless I’m traveling, and they let me know about flight delays, etc.),

  • Reminders (which I don’t use often, but I love being able to tell Siri to remind me to do something when I get home), and

  • My local emergency notification app.

No email. And definitely no news or social media. There’s no reason for you to let those things interrupt what you’ve chosen to spend your time doing. (For those of you resisting turning off email notifications, I just want to point out – if there’s an emergency, they’re going to call you.)

Recent studies have shown cell phones are raising our cortisol levels in a real way, which may shorten our lives. (WHAT? Though, also – I probably could have told you that based on my past experience with alerts.) By reducing the number of notifications you get, you’ll reduce the interruptive, stressful role of your phone. We’re saving lives here, people.

Want to make a change? Right now, go to your phone settings and, assuming you have an iPhone, select Notifications. Scroll through the apps listed there and turn “Off” the “Allow Notifications” buttons — except for those you want to authorize to have that interruptive power over you. For email notifications, if you want no notifications but do like that little number that shows up to tell you how many unread emails there are, leave notifications on, unclick the alert/banner options, turn off sound, but leave “badges” on.

Get intentional and take control. You’re in charge. Not your phone.

Check out ways to that we can work together here, I’d love to help you take back more control of your time.

Add a comment
+ show Comments
- Hide Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

check out my 8-week bright method time management program

Want to learn the full Bright Method, a system designed for working women that reduces stress and ups your peace of mind when it comes to managing it all (personal and professional)?

Learn more
Want to focus on email first?

Reclaim your time from your inbox

Spending too much time in your email inbox? You’re not alone. Check out my short’n’sweet, self-paced email management course to help you reclaim control over your inbox.

LOVE these strategies?

LEARN MORE

Free DOWNLOAD

Hello, more breathing space.

Learn three realistic time management strategies desgined for professional working women that you can implement in just 20 minutes. Enter your info below & get the free guide in your inbox in a minute.